For the Glory of the Lord Jesus Christ

Archive for September, 2015

Fourth and final blood moon tetrad coincides with super moon September 2015


Yahoo.comSeptember 27-28 will put on display for anyone watching the fourth and final blood moon tetrad that has coincided with the Jewish feasts of Passover and Tabernacles for the last two years.  Many have thought these occurrences to be spiritually significant, and truly only history will tell us of any significance in these matters.  Plus, tonight there will also be a super moon occurring as well, which will cause the moon to look excessively larger than normal.  This is also called the Harvest Moon.

If you live in the Northern hemisphere, the blood moon eclipse will begin at 1:07 UT, which translates to our time in the Central daylight time zone as:

Central Daylight Time (September 27, 2015)
Partial umbral eclipse begins: 8:07 p.m. CDT on September 27
Total eclipse begins: 9:11 p.m. CDT
Greatest eclipse: 9:47 p.m. CDT
Total eclipse ends: 10:23 p.m. CDT
Partial eclipse ends: 11:27 p.m. CDT Super blood moon central daylight times

However, if you live in central Illinois as of this writing, clouds have moved in with light rain and so unfortunately, unless it clears or there is a patch of open sky, the blood moon tetrad will not be as visible as hoped for tonight.  It might be worth driving to find an open portion of the sky.

Former dates of blood moon occurrences are according to Dates of blood moons

While it is fairly rare, a tetrad of lunar eclipses has occurred before and will occur again in the future. History and science tell us that tetrads or blood moons also came to pass in the following years:
•162-163 A.D.
•795-796 A.D.
•842-843 A.D.
•860-861 A.D.
•1493-1494 A.D.
•1949-1950
•1967-1968

That means that it’s been 46 years since this has happened, making it something that definitely gets the attention of the masses when it does occur.

So if you have the opportunity for a clear sky tonight, it is definitely worth going outside from 9 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. CDT, which will conclude the super blood moon tonight.

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Rosh Hashana, Jewish New Year 5776


Shofar horn for Rosh Hashanah near apples

Shofar horn for Rosh Hashanah near apples

Just now as sunset is coming on, Rosh Hashana has just begun, the Jewish New Year of 5776.  This holiday is celebrated every year with the blowing of the shofar, even the same as it was done when the Messiah, the Lord Jesus Christ walked upon the face of the earth.  This was also a time that Israel coronated its kings, and it was also a time that the people prepared for Yom Kippur, a high holy day for repentance.  Rosh Hashana is really just a one day feast day.  ‘However, the Sanhedrin would send out messengers to inform people that the new moon had been seen; but sometimes the messengers would actually be late by an entire day.  So by the time of the 12th century, Rosh Hashana was extended to a two day feast which was considered to be just one incredibly long day’ History.com .

Good food is an integral part of the celebrations; namely, challah (pronounced ‘hollah’) bread and apples dipped in honey which represents a ‘sweet new year’ and as such, the participants bless each other with sayings such as, “Shana Tovah,” meaning ‘A good new year.’  Some participants stand by a body of water and cast the contents of their pockets out onto the water which represents the casting away of their sins.

The next ten days are considered to be ‘high holy days’ in preparation for the culmination of Yom Kippur.  Rosh Hashana is also a ‘serious time to ask oneself if you have strayed from the path of righteousness.  How can one return and be better in the coming new year?  It is a wake-up call to wake up those that are sleeping and could have done better’ History.com.

So light some Shabbat candles and serve some apples and honey for a sweet new year.